Minister: Mexico has 'dignity intact' after US tariff deal

A man rides a bicycle next to a local market selling piñatas of Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador and US President Donald Trump, in Tijuana, Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2019. Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador is to hold a rally in Tijuana even as President Trump has put on hold his plan to begin imposing tariffs on Mexico on Monday, saying the U.S. ally will take "strong measures" to reduce the flow of Central American migrants into the United States. (AP Photo/Hans-Maximo Musielik)
Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador arrives at a rally in Tijuana, Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2019. The event was originally scheduled as an act of solidarity in the face of President Donald Trump's threat to impose a 5% tariff on Mexican imports if it did not stem the flow of Central American migrants heading toward the U.S. But Mexican and U.S. officials reached an accord Friday that calls on Mexico to crackdown on migrants in exchange for Trump backing off his threat. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
A woman waves a Mexican flag prior to the speech by Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador at a rally in Tijuana, Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2019. Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador will hold the rally in Tijuana even as President Trump has put on hold his plan to begin imposing tariffs on Mexico on Monday, saying the U.S. ally will take "strong measures" to reduce the flow of Central American migrants into the United States. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
Musicians perform near the plaza where Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador will hold a rally, in Tijuana, Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2019. Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador is to hold a rally in Tijuana even as President Trump has put on hold his plan to begin imposing tariffs on Mexico on Monday, saying the U.S. ally will take "strong measures" to reduce the flow of Central American migrants into the United States. (AP Photo/ Hans-Maximo Musielik)
A man rides a bicycle next to a local market selling piñatas of Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador and US President Donald Trump, in Tijuana, Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2019. Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador is to hold a rally in Tijuana even as President Trump has put on hold his plan to begin imposing tariffs on Mexico on Monday, saying the U.S. ally will take "strong measures" to reduce the flow of Central American migrants into the United States. (AP Photo/Hans-Maximo Musielik)
Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, center, arrives at a rally in Tijuana, Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2019. The event was originally scheduled as an act of solidarity in the face of President Donald Trump's threat to impose a 5% tariff on Mexican imports if it did not stem the flow of Central American migrants heading toward the U.S. But Mexican and U.S. officials reached an accord Friday that calls on Mexico to crackdown on migrants in exchange for Trump backing off his threat. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador arrives at a rally in Tijuana, Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2019. The event was originally scheduled as an act of solidarity in the face of President Donald Trump's threat to impose a 5% tariff on Mexican imports if it did not stem the flow of Central American migrants heading toward the U.S. But Mexican and U.S. officials reached an accord Friday that calls on Mexico to crackdown on migrants in exchange for Trump backing off his threat. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador waves to the crowd during a rally in Tijuana, Mexico, Saturday, June 8, 2019. Lopez Obrador held a rally in Tijuana even as President Trump has put on hold his plan to begin imposing tariffs on Mexico on Monday, saying the U.S. ally will take "strong measures" to reduce the flow of Central American migrants into the United States. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

TIJUANA, Mexico — Mexican Foreign Relations Secretary Marcelo Ebrard told a cheering crowd near the U.S. border on Saturday that his country emerged from high-stakes talks over U.S. tariffs with its "dignity intact."

The rally in Tijuana, a short walk from the border, was originally scheduled as an act of solidarity in the face of President Donald Trump's threat to impose a 5% tariff on Mexico's exports if it did not stem the flow of Central American migrants crossing its territory toward the U.S. The tariff threat had brought opposition from within Trump's own party for the economic disruption it would have caused.

But after Mexican and U.S. officials reached an accord late Friday that calls on Mexico to crackdown on migrants in exchange for Trump backing off his threat, officials here converted the rally into a celebration.

Ebrard, who helped negotiate the deal in Washington D.C., said when he arrived back home and gave the president his report, he told López Obrador: "There are no tariffs, Mr. President, we emerged with our dignity intact."

Speaking about the migrants, Ebrard said, "while they are in Mexico, we are going to be in solidarity with them."

A series of speakers at the boisterous, government-organized gathering, spoke of the importance of the U.S.-Mexico relationship and applauded Mexico's negotiating team. The rally had the feeling of a campaign event with lots of paraphernalia from López Obrador's ruling Morena party.

Tijuana residents at the rally said they supported the terms of the agreement. But residents just a block away expressed concern the deal could mean more asylum seekers having to wait in Tijuana and other Mexican border cities for the resolution of their cases in the U.S. That process can take months or even years.

Critics of the deal in Mexico say that other than a vague reiteration of a joint commitment to promote development, security and growth in Central America, the agreement focuses almost exclusively on enforcement and says little about the root causes driving the surge in migrants seen in recent months.

The deployment of 6,000 National Guard troops appears to be the key commitment in what was described as "unprecedented steps" by Mexico to ramp up enforcement, though Interior Secretary Olga Sánchez Cordero said that had already been planned and was not a result of external pressure.)

Another key element of the deal is that the United States will expand a program known as the Migrant Protection Protocol, or MPP. According to Mexican immigration authorities, since January there have been 10,393 returns by migrants to Mexico while their cases wend their way through U.S. courts.

Observers said a concern is that if the MPP rolls out on a mass scale along the United States' entire southern border, it could overwhelm Mexican border cities.

People also read these

US wants to force lower speeds on truck and bus drivers

Aug 26, 2016

The U.S. wants to forcibly limit how fast trucks, buses and other large vehicles can drive on the nation's highways

American's No. 2 executive departs for United Airlines

Aug 30, 2016

The president and No. 2 executive at American Airlines is leaving to take the same job with rival United Airlines

Global stocks rise amid upbeat manufacturing data

Sep 1, 2016

European stocks rose Thursday, buoyed by positive manufacturing data from Britain and China while investors await U.S. employment data later this week

Walk The Biz welcomes all casual and easygoing readers who seeks to digest business travel to international trade policy to starting in the transportation & shipping industry.

Contact us: sales@walkthebiz.com

Subscribe to our newsletter now!

Name:

Email: